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The 2017 Agenda: The Affordable Care Act and the New American Majority

January 13, 2017

The incoming president and the majority party in Congress have made it a priority to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. “Obamacare”).

As part of our overall goal to collect and highlight data that reveals the economic and political conditions of unmarried women and the New American Majority (which also includes people of color and millennials), we’ve analyzed how repealing the Affordable Care Act would affect these crucial populations, and collected polling data on what Americans think about the ACA. We’ve also done some preliminary analysis of some of the Republican “replacement” plans, and put together a list of policy considerations for unmarried women in particular in any discussion of repealing and replacing the ACA.

Here are some of the things we found:

Read the full reports here:

2017 ACA Agenda for Unmarried Women: Summary

A brief overview of the findings of our full report on the possible impacts of repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act for unmarried women and the New American Majority.

2017 ACA Agenda for Unmarried Women

Analysis of how the Affordable Care Act has helped unmarried women and the New American Majority—and the possible impacts of repealing and replacing the ACA.

We also think this is a good opportunity to highlight some of the data we put together last year about the economic status of unmarried women and the New American Majority in each state—including statistics on access to health insurance. Find your state’s statistical profile below:

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Massachusetts
Minnesota
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
Washington, DC
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Statistical profiles not available for Delaware, Idaho, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, or West Virginia.